A reality-check on the War on Cancer

President Nixon declared the war on cancer in the seventies and foresaw victory waiting around the door. Unfortunately, this goal was never achieved. We know that a cure for cancer is yet to be found.

Think about it: I am now 37 years old. If I go back in time, let’s say about 20 years, I barely knew anybody with cancer. And let’s go back another 20 years and look at the statistics or ask relatives or friends how much they knew about cancer or how many people they personally knew battling with the disease.

The fact of the matter is, every 8th women in the USA will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year. But just a few decades back ago we didn’t have such a higher number of incidents.

You probably know one or more people diagnosed with cancer. And unfortunately, it is likely that there’s even someone in your family who got diagnosed.

My wife Ann was diagnosed with breast cancer in March of 2009. In August 2009, my mother was hospitalized for removing a tumor – she has cervical cancer. On October 1st, just a few weeks ago, after I had encountered blood in my urine, my urologist ordered a CAT-Scan that revealed a 6.2 cm tumor in my left kidney.

I am about to have surgery during which my kidney will be removed entirely. It’s insane. Cancer is everywhere. It’s not that remote mysterious disease anymore that was likely to spare you.

So there is no way to say it: Cancer is actually growing, even though research and sciences were provided with large amounts of money over the years. And we have to admit, that President Nixon’s ‘War on Cancer’ is far from over. Needless to say, that the situation is the same everywhere in the Western World, it’s not just the USA.

Or do I just imagine all that? Is my wife’s cancer, my mother’s cancer and my own cancer just a coincidence or is there more to the picture. And what about the other ten people I know who also all got diagnosed in 2009.

But that’s just my opinion, and I know that a lot of people disagree with my standpoint. They argue with new data and studies which supposedly show a significant reduction in new breast cancer diagnoses and mortality rates.

You don’t need a Ph. D. in Mathematics to read the numbers that were published in the recent years about cancer rates. The problem is: you can look at numbers in many different ways. It’s the way they are being presented to the public. So sometimes they can be perceived incorrectly.

There is no doubt that improvements were made over the years in the ‘War on Cancer’. However, I believe everybody would agree that we are far away from victory. There is still a lot more to do until the final battle is one.

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